SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL PARK RELOCATES ELEPHANTS TO AREA WHERE THEY ROAMED 150 YEARS AGO

PORT ELIZABETH, SOUTH AFRICA-- History is being made in South Africa's Eastern Cape Province, where elephants are being relocated to a part of the Addo Elephant National Park where they last roamed 150 years ago.

Twenty-seven elephants have been moved to Darlington, a northern area of the reserve. The Addo Elephant National Park is the third largest national park in South Africa and has one of the highest concentration of the African elephant in the world.

More than 600 of the gentle giants call Addo Elephant National Park home. There are seven family groups in the park. The group which is being moved consists of 10 adult cows, three adult bulls, three sub-adult cows, seven sub-adult bulls, four calves, and the matriarch who will lead them in their new home.

The Darlington section of Addo is mainly covered by karoo vegetation. It has a low rainfall, supplementing the dry area is the massive Darlington dam which will be the elephants' new watering hole.

Although the vegetation is different, elephants are known to adapt to their surroundings. The area will be protected by more than a hundred kilometres of predator-proof boundary fencing and will have dedicated rangers on patrol round the clock.

Our wildlife is under threat, our natural heritage is under threat, if it weren't for the rangers and work that they do we would be a much poorer nation, says a senior section ranger in Addo, Arban Padayachee.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK